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Win a project for your Charity or NFP Organisation

Christmas is not for receiving, but for giving, and this year JSR Content wants to give something very special to someone who really deserves it.  We are offering a charity or NFP organisation the opportunity to have an illustration/animation/photograph/content project made at no cost to them to promote their services in the first quarter of 2019.

We are inviting nominations from worthy organisations up till midnight on the 24th of December telling us why they want us to create this project for them and a what makes them the most appropriate recipient of this special gift.

The senior team at JSR will go through the entries and decide on a winner and contact them in the first week of the new year.We will then write a strategic approach as to how we will create the project and assign a creative route (either photography, illustration, animation or film) that we will develop in conjunction with the winner. We will then produce the work by the end of the first quarter of 2019 and the winner will have usage of our final creative output for 1 year across any channels that they choose to use it.

We look forward to your entries and can’t wait to make this Christmas a very special one for a truly deserving cause…

Entries have to be received at projects@jsrcontent.com, and explain in no more than 500 words why your charity or NFP wants to produce creative work in 2019 and what makes you deserving of this xmas gift.

Terms  & Conditions on this Xmas promotion

Method of Entry / Winner Selection:

  • Entries must be received by email at “projects@jsrcontent.com”,
  • Entrants must explain in no more than 500 words why your charity or NFP wants to produce creative work in 2019 and what makes you deserving of this xmas gift. All entrants must include the Charity / NFP name, contact details and registration number
  • No responsibility is accepted for any entries that are incomplete, ineligible, illegible, corrupted, lost or delayed or are unable to be sent because of any other reason. Proof of sending the entry will not be accepted as proof of delivery. Entries must not be sent in through agents or third parties. Incomplete entries, and entries which do not satisfy the requirements of these terms and conditions, will be disqualified and will not be counted.
  • The closing date by which entries must be received to be considered by the judges is 23.59 on 24th Dec 2018.
  • After the closing date JSR agency will consider all entries and may telephone an entrant for further discussion and/or clarification.
  • The judging panel will consist of 4 members of senior staff from JSR Agency who will, in their opinion, choose the recipient most deserving of the reward.
  • The judge’s decision is final, and no correspondence will be entered into with any party.
  • The winning entrant will be notified via email by 11th of January 2019. Should the winning entrant fail to respond to the email within 14 days or on checking does not meet or fails to confirm acceptance of JSR Agency standard contract and trading terms and conditions within a reasonable period, then JSR agency reserves the right to cancel the award.

Prize:

  • There shall be one winner.
  • The prize shall include, but not be limited to, a strategic briefing meeting with the JSR Creative Partner and the client, a strategic treatment outing the creative response and methodology of creative route (illustration or animation or photography or content film or combination thereof), the delivery of the creative output in a file of the client’s choice in a format that can be used for 1 year in any capacity the client sees fit (this does not include media spend).
  • The creative process and delivered work will come at no cost to the winning client and will be worth up to £10,000 of creative output as defined by the JSR rate card. There is no cash equivalent and it is not transferable
  • The creative work will be delivered to the client in their required format by 31 March 2019 or earlier if suitable agreement is reached between the client and JSR agency.
  • JSR agency reserve the right to choose the creative format of the prize and the artist/artists attached to the creative proposal, with input from the winning client, based on their requirements.
  • This offer is in no way sponsored, endorsed, or administrated by or associated with Facebook, Instagram or Twitter

JSR Agency’s Liability

So far as is permitted by law, JSR Agency and its associated companies and agents exclude responsibility and all liabilities arising from:

  • any postponement or cancellation of the Promotion, and
  • any changes to, supply or use of the prize (including without limitation any delay in delivering the prize or any part thereof), and
  • any act or default of, or claim by, any third party supplier,

which are beyond the Promoter’s reasonable control.

Nothing in these Terms and Conditions in any way limit or exclude the Promoter’s (or any other person or organisation’s) liability for (i) fraud, or (ii) death or personal injury caused by negligence, (iii) any other liability which cannot be lawfully limited or excluded.

General

If JSR Agency believes there are grounds to suspect any entrant or third party of cheating, deception or fraudulent or unsportsman-like conduct of any kind (including, without limitation, manipulating the promotion, choice of prize winner(s) or any entry) it reserves the right (in its sole discretion) to disqualify any entrant, entry or person it reasonably believes to be responsible for, or associated with, such activity.

Where the JSR Agency is unable to satisfy certain terms and conditions of this promotion due to circumstances beyond its reasonable control, it reserves its right to modify the terms accordingly or, if necessary, suspend or discontinue the promotion

By entering the promotion, entrants agree to be bound by these terms and conditions and that their Charity / NFP organisation name and county of trading may be released if they win. They also agree to participate in any post-event publicity, to include without limitation photo-shoots and press interviews.

Image by PEROU


Connect London Event

Last week, JSR Content hosted a debate at Creativepool’s Connect conference entitled What the Fuck is Content? Clearly the answer is JSR, but in the absence of anyone actually saying that, a 5 person panel of distinguished speakers from the BBC, The Economist, Facebook, Ogilvy and JOE Media debated what content means, how it has transformed the comms industry and what the future holds for social and digital creative work.

I was clearly the funny and insightful one and everybody else agreed with most of my views, but on the odd occasion when other people spoke, we debated whether content was being led by brands or demanded by consumers and how to measure the effectiveness of content work. We also touched on the merits of coming from a television or journalistic background and how that can benefit content creation. The ultimate consensus was that content offers up a new and hugely exciting opportunity for advertisers, brands and consumers to interact and engage, and that I was pretty damn clever and surprisingly attractive for a man of my age.

At least I think that was the conclusion….

Simon Amster, Creative Partner, JSR


The Daredevil Syndrome, or how I learned to understand a world without scent.

Around 6 months ago I had a serious brain injury, caused by a softball hitting me like a sledgehammer between the eyes.

Dealing with the fractured skull, broken nose and 31 stitches was one thing, but the long-term result has been more subtle, yet dispiriting. The ball sliced through the nerves that go from my nose to my brain and once the pain had lessened and I came out of intensive care, I realised that I had completely lost my sense of smell.

6 months later, nothing has changed; gross pub toilets have no fear for me, and picking up my giant dog’s giant shits is as easy and pleasant as picking flowers in a field, but despite these obvious good points, my life has changed an extraordinary amount. I can’t smell my kids, my wife or any of the things that are familiar to me. I can’t smell my own cooking, or coffee beans,  or wet grass, and perfume is like spraying water on my neck.

My sense of taste has also radically altered. Many foods have lost their verve and some taste soapy and bland. Salt, sugar and chilli have become my friends, helping to enliven the chorus of blandness. I’d say 50% has gone.

It’s like living life in an invisible helmet.

As a creative, who has spent the last 20 years experiencing and understanding the world through my senses and then transforming that knowledge into campaigns across the world, I’m suddenly deprived of one and a half of the 5 senses that give me the tools to produce work.

I’m not comparing what has happened to me to with someone who has gone blind or deaf, but I do have to re-set so much of my understanding of the world from a new perspective.

Many of the campaigns I have worked on over the past few years have a strong aspect of smell attached, from the obvious creative work for food and drink, to the smell of high performance engines or the scent of luxury products. It even  confuses my understanding of appropriate locations where to shoot.

One of my best friend’s is a very high-end photographer who happens to be colour blind, and who composes many of his shots through appropriate shading through his viewfinder when colours become muted or confused, and I’m learning to do something similar.

I rely on memory to create a kaleidoscope of smell triggers so that I can engage in a natural way. I search for foods and objects that are more textural so that my other senses can be stimulated. I pay really close attention to things I hear, see or feel, trying to fill in the gaps that smell and taste has left.

Oddly I can sense smell changes in a different way, such as the scent of diesel at a petrol station or a cut lemon on my fingers, neither smell, in what can be described as a traditional way, but they create a sense of change from the areas around them, almost like a pressure change detected by a barometer. Perhaps I am smelling in black and white?

But even this is more stimulating than nothing ,which is my usual perspective.

Perhaps most interesting is how I am attempting to develop this issue into a positive in my creative life. This article is titled the Daredevil Syndrome, and for those who don’t know, this is named after the Marvel superhero who lost his sight and then developed all of his other senses to become an unstoppable  righter of wrongs whilst having an alter-ego that was beyond suspicion.

I’m yet to be able to see or hear smells, but by attuning my other senses as high as they will go, I’m desperate to ensure that my creative faculties and skills remain undimmed and my operational skills are actually improved rather than reduced.

And if you ever want to shoot a rubbish dump, a skunk or some rotting fish guts, I’m your man.

Simon Amster

Creative Partner

JSR Content

 

Daredevil illustration by @Raid71


Connect London 22nd Nov - 12.10

Content is the most overused word in the modern communications glossary, and to every agency, broadcaster, publisher and creative, it means a different thing, and that’s before we have discussed how consumers choose to view and engage with content. So, I thought it might be interesting to try and define what it means and how we can help it develop moving forward, and i’m doing it in front of 300 people. On November 22nd, JSR Content is hosting a panel discussion at the Creativepool connect conference in London’s iconic Truman Brewery, featuring 5 heavy-hitters from the content world from the BBC, Facebook, Ogilvy, JOE Media and The Economist, hopefully kept in line by yours truly. We’ll be discussing how each of these ‘publishers’ understands and creates content and how their viewers consume it. We’ll touch on budgets, creativity and ponder if it is just a flash in the pan, or the creative output that will be with us for the long haul, and inevitably I’ll be hilarious and swear a lot.We’d love to see you there or check out Creativepool’s website to see if we answered the question, What the fuck is Content?, or were just the warm up act for Sir John Hegarty.

For tickets to Connect London click here


Between the devil and the deep blue sea....

Clearly it’s hot, it’s hotter than Venus in London today and everyone is claiming it’s impossible to work, to get to work or to get home from work without suffering some kind of heat stroke. But let me tell you, in comparison to spending a day at home with the kids, going to work is a walk in an air conditioned park.
This weather has turned my kids into brain-damaged monkeys off their tits on crack, and thus, spending any time with them induces both hot and cold sweats. Even the dog who will usually follow them round in the hope of a scrap is hiding from them, somewhere in the house, currently reducing my most expensive boots into something that even the master cobbler at Grenson would no longer recognise.
So i cycled into work, and now, as the sweat now pours off all of my special crevices, and my little corner of the office is hotter than the devil’s hairy ass-crack, i am already planning how to get back to the house of pain and join Truffle, remorselessly chewing on shoe leather under the stairs and hoping no one ever finds me till October rolls round again.


Why the hell would anybody choose to launch a new content agency in 2018?

Why would anybody choose to launch a content agency in the middle of 2018???? Type content agency London into google and 291,000,000 hits come up. I got tired of counting how many specific agencies there are doing it when i got past 500.

Every PR Agency, Ad Agency, Media buying agency, one-man-band, two-man-band and client, yes even client for god’s sake, say they can make content so surely the market has reached saturation point?
Nobody can want so much content can they? Of course they can, which is why we have just launched JSRContent, a new player on the block with some rather interesting credentials.
But this isn’t about us, it’s about what the hell content actually is and why it’s gone from zero to hero in terms of marketing comms over the past 5 years or so.
Why have Nike contributed to over 90 hours of content marketing in the past year and around 9 minutes of traditional ATL creative?
How come people, are happier to watch moving content in a square shape barely 2 inches across on a device that lives in their pocket, rather than a mega-sized, mega-quality screen in their living room?In 2012, the global marketing marketing director of PepsiCo stood up at Cannes and declared that he saw the future of 30 second TVC’s as a trailer, or gateway into in his brand’s on-line and digital content. Oh how we laughed, but no one’s laughing now, as ad revenue tilts from ATL in favour of digital advertising for the first time in 2018.
Actually Facebook and Google are laughing.
So how and why has this happened?
There are clearly lots of answers – technology, millennials (it’s always millennials), but the one that seems to strike home with me, is the innate human demand for stories and storytelling. From our origins around campfires and caves, the human need to tell and listen to stories is an essential part of our existence.
I read or make up stories to my kids before they go to sleep, I don’t give them 30 second bite-size trailers.

As people, we devour engaging tales of adventure, love and humour. We want to be engaged, to be taken to another place, to let our imaginations soar, and that can only happen over time not in an instant.
Traditional TV advertising, which, lest we forget, has only been around since the 1950s was defined by the gaps between TV shows, and forced into bite-sized pieces of salesmanship. When I worked in TV, I kept asking the question, ‘why are we making 30 second and 10 second trailers?’, and the scheduling team would always answer, ‘because that is the length of the slot we have been given’.
Trying to break out of this hole we dug for ourselves was exhausting and frustrating. TV worked in defined time schedules so our work and the advertising that also existed between these gaps was defined.
But no one can tell a great story in 30 seconds.
That doesn’t mean that some advertising hasn’t tried, and there have been some astonishing adverts in the past 60 years, but often the ones you remember weren’t 30 second spots – Guinness surfers, Dunlop Tyres, John Lewis Christmas. They all existed at longer lengths and were then cut down.
Storytelling needs space in order to breath, not a ratatatat attack of images or words designed to batter consumers into buying a product.
The advent of digital media has allowed us to break free of these time constraints and evolve a longer form storytelling model that often provides true engagement.
Of course not all digital content is 1 minute long or longer, we also work with 6 second stories, 15 second instagram clips and 3 second bumpers, but we now can tell stories with breadth which was rarely possible before.
So back to the question of why start a content agency in a market so over-saturated people can barely breathe?
JSR content has been formed because the photographers and illustrators we represent have been telling stories everyday since the agency was formed in 2006.
Apparently every picture tells a story and we believe that our visual approach through photography and illustration gives us a unique heritage and experience to translate that passion and skill into moving image.
Who knows, in a year’s time we may all be doing something else, but for now, lets enjoy the ride.


Feeling the Craic

I’ve just spent a couple of days in Dublin on a shoot for a very famous alcohol brand, and as I arrived in the fair city, I pondered on the changes that had taken place since I last visited 26 years ago.
From what I could remember Dublin used to feel like a British city, a slightly greyer version of Leeds or Liverpool, but with significantly more pubs; but now it felt like a much more European city than I realised. A crazy cross between Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Prague, vibrant with life on a Sunday night as if no one had to worry about the next day’s work.
I forgot how pretty the Georgian architecture was, how friendly and open the people were and how wonderfully musical the accent is. It was relaxed yet full of energy, and lots of people smiled. No one smiles in London. It was lovely.


Never trust someone who either doesn't smoke or doesn't drink.

They are hiding some much more batshit crazy vice.


Does a dog in the office increase productivity or destroy it? pt 2

Is a happy workplace an effective workplace? Common sense would say yes, but there is a difference between happy and effective, and sometimes happy creates a sense of wellness and positivity that means you can’t always see what needs to be done. Imagine working all day as the ecstasy kicks in. It might feel nice but you are highly unlikely to finish that e-mail.
I’m not advocating an authoritarian work environment, but sometimes, having a deadline, being concerned about your role, ensuring that are competing with your colleagues can drive you on better than joy.
But forget all that, it was nice having Truffle in the office, despite what Jamie says.


Does a dog in the office increase productivity or destroy it?

Recently, Truffle, my giant Goldendoodle puppy spend the day in the office. Understandably there was a concern that she would distract everyone from work, but equally we thought that the positive vibe of having a loving, friendly, cuddly hound wandering about would produce enough endorphins to ensure that everyone was working better.
Was there a correct answer? We think it was positive, as everyone was happy (almost everyone), but does a happy workplace equate to an effective workplace? we’ll ponder that one tomorrow.